As Paris, Milan, New York and London are the most illustrious Fashion Weeks, it’s easy to allow those more arguably under the radar to slip through the net. Of course, I’m talking about the likes of Copenhagen, Berlin and Stockholm, which are circling further into the public sphere, due to the ever-increasing talent on show. This January, Copenhagen showcased designers like Ganni, Holzweiler and Cecilie Bahnsen, and the calibre only got better in Stockholm last week.

Given the state of its governmental affairs – with Stefan Löfven’s recent election following four months of political deadlock and a hung parliament. Perhaps, a couple of days of astounding talent and joviality is just what the Swedish capital required. Here, we take you through our four favourite shows from Stockholm fashion week.

Dagmar

Dagmar

Karin Söderlind, Kristina Tjäder, and Sofia Wallenstam, the sister trio behind Dagmar, showcased a wholly sustainable collection. Materials like recycled wool, no-kill fur made from hair sheared lambs, mohair goats, and alpacas as well as certified viscose stole the show, but any new-age hippy connotations environmentalist clothes might once have had can indeed be left behind. Oversized tailored and ‘fur’ coats, were worn over simple knits, trousers and skirts, while the footwear appeared to be a tale of two halves – strappy heels formed as an antithesis to heavy soled boots, which were both on show.

Tiger of Sweden

Tiger of Sweden

Christoffer Lundman showcased his first womenswear collection for Tiger of Sweden, since leaving Burberry to become Creative Director. Tailored trousers under dresses, cargo pants with satin patches and slightly-longer-than-normal sleeves under the umbrella of exquisite tailoring made for a gorgeous, sartorially excellent collection. Nineteen out of twenty of the looks were all shown with either a white or black pointed shoe. However, there was one anomaly – a homage to Swedish Träskor’s – a striking, furry pair of clogs.

Rave Review

Rave Review

Josephine Bergqvist and Livia Schück, founders of Rave Review, might think the above designers trite, given their clashing use of bright colours and loud patterns that certainly stood out from the usual neutral palettes seen across Scandi-style. Their collection was refreshing – fully sustainable and upcycled. They use only second-hand clothes and materials, a process they have stood by since their collection was founded two years ago. Flowing silhouettes with silky fabrics, mixed up with boxy leather trenches and industrial-style chains used as accessories made for an exciting and diverse collection.

Per Götesson

Per Götesson

Per Götesson made his name when he showcased at London Men’s after being snapped up by Fashion East three years ago. Now, he’s back in his homeland and showcasing at the seminal Nordiska Museum, where he drew his initial inspiration for his first Men’s collection. There was a mix of billowing, wide-leg trousers in denim, 80s style shoulder pads on chequered blazers, asymmetrical silhouettes and cut-up tops – all styled by Anna Pesonen. The aggressive norms of male sexuality are questioned in this sensual collection, displayed in a romantic museum.

Words: Rachel Hagan